Managing content for effective employee communications

Organizational communication in a system the size of Piedmont Healthcare will always be a challenge.

As organizations increase in size, formal top-down communication becomes more difficult, more removed, and less responsive to communication traveling up the hierarchy.

The role of the employee intranet is multi-dimensional. It is an information resource, a communications vehicle, a training playground, and a feedback mechanism. It allows employees to interact with the organization in ways not previously possible, and it allows them to improve their job skills. A well-managed employee intranet allows organizations to provide constant information to help employees perform their jobs more efficiently by providing:

  • Company news, departmental newsletters, or weekly letters from the president
  • Employee handbook, expense report submissions, and so on
  • Operations policies and procedures manuals
  • Addition, deletion, and change of submissions to Human Resources
  • IT Support Desk trouble ticket submission and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • White papers
  • Training documentation and schedules for new employees

At Piedmont Healthcare, I implemented new content management policies and procedures that increased usage of the employee intranet by 400 percent. It included adding a daily feature story, linking back to that story from multiple places, populating and managing a global calendar, launching and managing a daily e-mail digest sent to every active employee e-mail address, and studying available metrics to identify issues and topics that interested employees.

The front page of the employee intranet included “ads” on the sidebar that drove user traffic to important initiatives – like the implementation of Epic EMR and training for the Always Safe cannon – and included tabs that helped users quickly identify paths to their destination. Click here for a PDF of this page.

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